General

Central Park Hotel is an experience of excellence in every sense. Sighisoara’s new downtown treasure offers luxurious yet comfortable rooms and lounges, an elevated dining experience, a unique wine bar, and opportunities to experience traditional Romania through local excursions. The building hosting the hotel was originally built in 1897 by Joseph Teusch, a Sighisoara born business man. It served as a home and business center for 50 years.

Rooms facilities: Free WiFi and spacious units, decorated with paintings, with flat-screen cable TV and minibar.The private bathroom is fitted with bath or shower, bathrobe and slippers.

Hotel facilities: room service, 24-hour front desk, express check-in/check-out, luggage storage, laundry, dry cleaning, ironing service, shoeshine, daily maid service, meeting/banquet facilities, fax/photocopying, safety deposit box, non-smoking rooms, facilities for disabled guests,  Lift, soundproof rooms, heating, allergy-free room, non-smoking throughout, air conditioning.

Facilities

  • Air Conditioning
  • Elevator
  • Facilities for disabled guests
  • Fitness center
  • Luggage storage
  • Meeting/banquet facilities
  • Non-smoking rooms
  • Restaurant
  • Smoking area
  • Wireless

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Sighisoara Medieval Citadel

Things to do - general

Sighisoara Medieval Citadel – one of the most beautiful and best-preserved medieval towns in Europe

Founded by Transylvanian Saxons during the 12th century, Sighisoara (Schassburg in German) still stands as one of the most beautiful and best-preserved medieval towns in Europe. Designated as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO, this perfectly intact 16th century gem with nine towers, cobbled streets, burgher houses and ornate churches rivals the historic streets of Old Prague or Vienna for atmospheric magic. It is also the birthplace of Vlad Dracula, also known as Vlad Tepes (Vlad the Impaler), ruler of the province of Walachia from 1456 to 1462. It was he who inspired Bram Stoker’s fictional creation, Count Dracula.

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Sighisoara’s citadel was built in the 12th century, when it was known as Castrum Sex (Fort Six), and was further strengthened and extended in the 15th century. The name must have existed long before, as the Saxons built their walled town on the ruins of a former Roman fortress. In 1298, the town was mentioned as Schespurch, while in 1367 it was called Civitas de Seguswar. The name of Sighisoara was first noted in a written document issued by Vlad Dracul, Vlad the Impaler’s father, in 1431.

Sighisoara was not the biggest or richest of the seven Saxon walled citadels* in Transylvania, but it has become one of the most popular. A walk through the town’s hilly streets with their original medieval architecture, magical mix of winding cobbled alleys, steep stairways, secluded squares, towers, turrets and enchantingly preserved citadel, is like stepping back in time.

Culture and history

Culture & history The Citedel Square lies at the heart of the citadel. In the old days, street markets, craft fairs, public executions and witch trials were held here. From this square, you can easily access the main attractions of Sighisoara. Sighisoara's main point of attraction is the Clock Tower, also known as the Council Tower, built in the second half of the 14th century and expanded in the 16th century. The four small corner turrets on top of the tower symbolized the judicial autonomy of the Town Council, which could apply, if necessary, the death penalty. Not far from the Clock Tower stands the Church of the Dominican Monastery. First attested in a document in 1298 as part of a Dominican monastic settlement, the church became the Saxons' main Lutheran church in 1556. The monastic complex demolished in 1888 and its place was taken by the present town hall. Only the church has remained from the original structure. To the north of the Clock Tower stands one of the most representative gothic-style structures in Transylvania, the Church on the Hill - so called because of its location on the School Hill (1,373 ft high). First mentioned in a document in 1345 and superposed on a former Roman basilica, its construction lasted almost 200 years.

Initially a Catholic church, it became the main church of the Saxon inhabitants of Sighisoara, who had shifted from Roman Catholicism to Lutheranism after the 1547 Reform. The church is reached by a covered wooden staircase known as the Scholars' Stairs. Built in 1642, the covered stair-passage was meant to facilitate and protect schoolchildren and churchgoers on their climb to the school and church during wintertime. Originally, the stairs had 300 steps, but after 1849, their number was reduced to 175.

The Vlad Dracul House is located in the Citadel Square, close to the Clock Tower. This ocher-colored house is the place where Vlad Tepes, the inspiration for Bram Stoker's famous Dracula, was born in 1431 and lived with his father, Vlad Dracul, until 1435 when they moved to Targoviste. A wrought-iron dragon hangs above the entrance. The ground floor of the house serves as a restaurant, while the first floor is home to the Museum of Weapons.
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Availability

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